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Watch It! Stress Can Damage Your Mouth Functioning

Sat, Jan 17, 2015
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Stress in any part of the body leads to some amount of damage in that region, and so too with your mouth. Stress in the mouth can cause damage to your teeth, gums and other parts of your mouth.

Stress in any part of the body leads to some amount of damage in that region, and so too with your mouth. Stress in the mouth can cause damage to your teeth, gums and other parts of your mouth.

Born of stress, you may perform the following actions:

Develop sores in the mouth: You may develop canker sores that are small white or gray ulcers with a red edge. They appear in the mouth in twos or more. Though their cause is unknown, they could develop as a reaction to low immunity, virus or bacteria, stress, allergies or exhaustion. However, they are not contagious.

Treatment: You can get rid of them by eating non-spicy and highly acidic food like citrus fruits and tomatoes. Topical anesthetics also help get rid of them, usually within 10 days.

On the other hand, cold sores are caused by the virus called herpes simplex virus. They are filled with fluid and can be seen on the lips, near the chin or below the nose. They are contagious. They can be due to an emotional problem, or due to sunburn, fever or a cut or scraping of the skin.

Treatment: They heal within a week but since it is viral, you should not delay the treatment. Take OTC drugs and antiviral medicines.

Gum Disease: Whether you go through stress in the short-term or long, stress manifests as huge deposits of dental plaque. In the long-term, stress can lead to gingivitis or bleeding gums, leading to gum disease.

Treatment: Visit your dentist without delay. Brush your teeth twice a day, rinse your mouth with antibacterial rinse and eat a balanced diet comprising vegetables and fruit.

Depression: Another effect of gum disease is depression.

Treatment: Ask your dentist how to deal with this problem and use coping strategies to face the challenges in your life.

Bruxism: This condition refers to clenching and grinding your teeth in your sleep, or through the day or even subconsciously. It is a known fallout of stress. If you are a victim of this condition, stress could only worsen it and cause conditions like TMJ or Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ), that is at the joint near the ear where the lower jaw and skull meet in a joint.

Treatment: Speak to a maxillofacial dentist who's equipped to deal with this condition. You may be given a night guard to wear before bed and another during the day to prevent any further damage.

Bad oral habits: When under stress, you may not pay too much attention to your daily habits. So, you may avoid brushing or flossing your teeth and rinsing your mouth. Done over a prolonged period, this could lead to problems in your mouth, such as gum disease or cavities.

Treatment: Being stressed also means you binge on foods that aren't good for your oral health like aerated drinks and sugar-based foods. This can lead to several dental problems. Eat healthy foods, exercise to increase your energy levels and make you come out of your stress.

While it is easy to say that stay away from stress, you can’t really. But you can at least reduce stress. It is not only good for your oral health it is great for your mental health. 



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